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A networking organisation for plants-related research and impact
 
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Talks related to energy research.
Updated: 1 hour 22 min ago

Mon 23 Jan 19:30: Synthetic biology - TBC

Fri, 01/07/2022 - 20:01
Synthetic biology - TBC

Abstract not available

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Thu 09 Jun 11:30: See Below

Tue, 07/06/2022 - 09:15
See Below

Paddy Mortimer – CO2 sequestration in layered anticlines Holly Smith – Improving electrolytes for sodium batteries

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Thu 09 Jun 11:30: See Below

Mon, 06/06/2022 - 10:13
See Below

Paddy Mortimer – CO2 sequestration in layered anticlines Holly Smith -

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Mon 13 Jun 19:30: CSAR lecture: Are we alone?

Wed, 01/06/2022 - 10:36
CSAR lecture: Are we alone?

We live in a universe perfectly suited to our existence, containing galaxies, stars, planets and the building blocks of life. On Earth, life is found in rocks, ice and boiling water, suggesting it would be impossible to destroy, before the Sun becomes a red giant and evaporates our planet. Yet space is silent, suggesting, that though simple life may be common, technologically advanced life might be very rare.

We will present the evidence, then take a closer look at the development of life on Earth, before considering why we might be the only self-aware observers of our universe.

Please book via Eventbrite: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/csar-lecture-dr-robin-catchpole-inst-of-astronomy-are-we-alone-tickets-354443689617

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Thu 09 Jun 11:30: Crystallisation fouling from aqueous solutions of clathrate hydrates and

Tue, 17/05/2022 - 10:20
Crystallisation fouling from aqueous solutions of clathrate hydrates and

Anastasia Karela -Crystallisation fouling from aqueous solutions of clathrate hydrates

Paddy Mortimer – CO2 sequestration in layered anticlines

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Tue 07 Jun 15:00: Chemical Analysis of Lithium in Battery Materials with high spatial resolution using EDS and EELS in the Electron Microscope

Tue, 17/05/2022 - 09:48
Chemical Analysis of Lithium in Battery Materials with high spatial resolution using EDS and EELS in the Electron Microscope

This seminar will present the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) SU-9000 from Hitachi which characterizes thin and massive samples with electrons beam energies ranging from 0.1 to 30 keV. This microscope is equipped with an electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) detector which allows the detection of Lithium. High spatial resolution images are possible with a resolution of 0.16 nm. Many examples will be presented on Li materials and on nano-materials. This microscope is equipped with a EDS detector of lithium (Extreme, Oxford Instrument) and the microanalysis of lithium compounds, which is very difficult and challenging, will also be covered. The preparation of thin films by focus ion beam (FIB) for high spatial resolution images in STEM will be also shown with the newly acquired Hitachi NX-5000 FIB .

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Thu 19 May 11:30: Optofluidic hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

Mon, 16/05/2022 - 09:53
Optofluidic hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

Liquid-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibres (HC-PCF) are excellent optofluidic microreactors in which light propagates in well-defined modes at the centre of a microchannel [1]. They enable efficient photochemistry, photo-switching, and photocatalysis at optical powers that are five orders of magnitude lower than in conventional reactors [1]. In addition, sample volumes in HC-PCF can be as small as a few nL per cm interaction length while meter-long optical paths enable sensitive absorption, fluorescence, and Raman spectroscopy.

In my talk, I will discuss how optofluidic HC-PCF can help improve our understanding of photochemical and electrochemical processes relevant to the green energy transition.

First, we demonstrate an operando Raman spectroscopy method that tracks the chemistry of liquid electrolytes during battery cycling. An optofluidic hollow-core fibre is integrated into a working Li: ion cell and used to analyse sub-microlitre electrolyte samples at different stages of the charge-discharge cycle by background-free Raman spectroscopy. The observed changes in electrolyte composition are related to the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formation and can reveal early signs of battery degradation [2].

Second, we use HC-PCF, connected to microfluidic coupling cells, to optimise photocatalytic “solar-fuel” generation in hybrid colloidal systems that combine molecular catalysts with particulate light absorbers. We focus on carbon-nanodots, one of the most promising light-absorber materials, due to their unique combination of scalability, biocompatibility, water solubility, and stable optical properties [3]. Key to improving their performance in solar catalysis are charge-transfer processes that we investigate and optimise through fibre-based absorption [4], fluorescence [8], and Raman spectroscopy [9].

Finally, I will briefly discuss how holographic spatial light modulation techniques can be used to excite higher-order modes in HC-PCFs, with the aim to selectively probe surface- and bulk processes within optofluidic microreactors [7,8].

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Thu 16 Jun 11:30: The Geobattery Concept – a sustainable future for shallow geothermal resources?

Wed, 11/05/2022 - 15:18
The Geobattery Concept – a sustainable future for shallow geothermal resources?

Heating the air in our buildings is responsible for almost ¼ of all UK CO2 emissions and is a sector we need to decarbonise quickly to meet net zero targets. Abandoned coal mines have huge potential to provide a low carbon heat resource due to their expected connectivity and transmissivity, readily available warm water, and their co-location with heat demand. However, we need to be careful how we develop these resources to avoid over exploitation because heat demand is often far greater than recharge rate. At the same time industrial processes exhaust ~46 TWh of excess heat per year into the atmosphere squandering an important and valuable resource. In this talk I will present recent work from our group at the University of Edinburgh investigating the energy balance of shallow geothermal resources and thermal energy storage from both an energy and reservoir stability perspective. I will also introduce the Geobattery concept as a possible way of recycling industrial excess heat to maximise mine water heat potential and ensure the effective management of shallow geothermal resources.

Bio

Andrew Fraser-Harris is a post-doctoral research associate in GeoEnergy at the University of Edinburgh. He studied for an MSci in Geology at the University of Birmingham with a year at the University of Auckland which sparked his interest in Geoenergy, particularly geothermal energy. He then did an MScR and PhD in coupled process modelling before continuing onto a post-doc at Edinburgh combining experimental equipment development with numerical modelling to study radioactive waste disposal, conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon recovery, rock mechanics, integrated risk assessments, and geothermal energy. His recent focus is on technologies to decarbonise heating through low temperature resources.

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Fri 20 May 14:00: Emerging Energy Materials: Electrified Heating and Wood

Tue, 10/05/2022 - 10:30
Emerging Energy Materials: Electrified Heating and Wood

I lead an Energy Materials and Devices research group at the University of Maryland, College Park, with a major mission to address the CO2 challenge. Our current research interests include (1) ultrahigh-temperature synthesis of new materials and their use in advanced energy devices, (2) beyond Li-ion batteries for transportation and the grid, and (3) wood nanoscience and nanotechnologies.

In this seminar I will share my group’s research and development of electrified ultrahigh-temperature synthesis as a novel platform for discovering and manufacturing new energy and environmental materials. I will start with the design and fabrication of ultrahigh temperature heaters, followed by two specific research topics, including high entropy nanoparticles (Science 2018, 359, 1489, Cover) and a high-performance battery membrane (Science 2020, 358, 521, Cover). Then I will give an overview of wood nanoscience and nanotechnologies and a few specific examples including solid state ion conductors (Nature 2021) and radiation cooling (Science 2019, 364, 760)

Bio: Liangbing Hu received his B.S. in physics from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2002, where he worked on colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials for three years. He did his Ph.D. (2002–2007) at UCLA , focusing on carbon-nanotube-based nanoelectronics. In 2006, he joined Unidym, Inc. as a co-founding scientist, leading the development of roll-to-roll printed carbon nanotube films and device integration in touch screens, LCDs, flexible OLE Ds, and solar cells. He did his postdoc at Stanford University from 2009–2011, where he worked on various energy storage technologies using nanomaterials/nanostructures. Currently, he is a Herbert Rabin Distinguished Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. His research group focuses on materials innovations, device integration, and manufacturing, with ongoing research activities on electrified ultrahigh-temperature synthesis, energy storage beyond Li-ion batteries, and novel wood nanotechnologies.

Dr. Hu has published ~400 research papers (including 10 Science and Nature). He has received many awards, including: the Highly Cited Researchers list by Clarivate Analytics (2016-2021), a Blavatnik National Awards Honoree; the TAPPI Nano Middle Career Award (2019); 2018/2020/2021 R&D 100 Winner, the Nano Letters Young Investigator Lectureship (2017), the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award (2016), and the Air Force Young Investigator Award (AFOSR YIP , 2013). He is an MRS fellow.

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Fri 20 May 14:00: Emerging Energy Materials: Electrified Heating and Wood

Tue, 10/05/2022 - 09:16
Emerging Energy Materials: Electrified Heating and Wood

I lead an Energy Materials and Devices research group at the University of Maryland, College Park, with a major mission to address the CO2 challenge. Our current research interests include (1) ultrahigh-temperature synthesis of new materials and their use in advanced energy devices, (2) beyond Li-ion batteries for transportation and the grid, and (3) wood nanoscience and nanotechnologies.

In this seminar I will share my group’s research and development of electrified ultrahigh-temperature synthesis as a novel platform for discovering and manufacturing new energy and environmental materials. I will start with the design and fabrication of ultrahigh temperature heaters, followed by two specific research topics, including high entropy nanoparticles (Science 2018, 359, 1489, Cover) and a high-performance battery membrane (Science 2020, 358, 521, Cover). Then I will give an overview of wood nanoscience and nanotechnologies and a few specific examples including solid state ion conductors (Nature 2021) and radiation cooling (Science 2019, 364, 760)

Bio: Liangbing Hu received his B.S. in physics from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2002, where he worked on colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials for three years. He did his Ph.D. (2002–2007) at UCLA , focusing on carbon-nanotube-based nanoelectronics. In 2006, he joined Unidym, Inc. as a co-founding scientist, leading the development of roll-to-roll printed carbon nanotube films and device integration in touch screens, LCDs, flexible OLE Ds, and solar cells. He did his postdoc at Stanford University from 2009–2011, where he worked on various energy storage technologies using nanomaterials/nanostructures. Currently, he is a Herbert Rabin Distinguished Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. His research group focuses on materials innovations, device integration, and manufacturing, with ongoing research activities on electrified ultrahigh-temperature synthesis, energy storage beyond Li-ion batteries, and novel wood nanotechnologies.

Dr. Hu has published ~400 research papers (including 10 Science and Nature). He has received many awards, including: the Highly Cited Researchers list by Clarivate Analytics (2016-2021), a Blavatnik National Awards Honoree; the TAPPI Nano Middle Career Award (2019); 2018/2020/2021 R&D 100 Winner, the Nano Letters Young Investigator Lectureship (2017), the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award (2016), and the Air Force Young Investigator Award (AFOSR YIP , 2013). He is an MRS fellow.

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Fri 20 May 14:00: Emerging Energy Materials: Electrified Heating and Wood

Mon, 09/05/2022 - 19:56
Emerging Energy Materials: Electrified Heating and Wood

I lead an Energy Materials and Devices research group at the University of Maryland, College Park, with a major mission to address the CO2 challenge. Our current research interests include (1) ultrahigh-temperature synthesis of new materials and their use in advanced energy devices, (2) beyond Li-ion batteries for transportation and the grid, and (3) wood nanoscience and nanotechnologies.

In this seminar I will share my group’s research and development of electrified ultrahigh-temperature synthesis as a novel platform for discovering and manufacturing new energy and environmental materials. I will start with the design and fabrication of ultrahigh temperature heaters, followed by two specific research topics, including high entropy nanoparticles (Science 2018, 359, 1489, Cover) and a high-performance battery membrane (Science 2020, 358, 521, Cover). Then I will give an overview of wood nanoscience and nanotechnologies and a few specific examples including solid state ion conductors (Nature 2021) and radiation cooling (Science 2019, 364, 760)

Bio: Liangbing Hu received his B.S. in physics from the University of Science and Technology of China in 2002, where he worked on colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials for three years. He did his Ph.D. (2002–2007) at UCLA , focusing on carbon-nanotube-based nanoelectronics. In 2006, he joined Unidym, Inc. as a co-founding scientist, leading the development of roll-to-roll printed carbon nanotube films and device integration in touch screens, LCDs, flexible OLE Ds, and solar cells. He did his postdoc at Stanford University from 2009–2011, where he worked on various energy storage technologies using nanomaterials/nanostructures. Currently, he is a Herbert Rabin Distinguished Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park. His research group focuses on materials innovations, device integration, and manufacturing, with ongoing research activities on electrified ultrahigh-temperature synthesis, energy storage beyond Li-ion batteries, and novel wood nanotechnologies.

Dr. Hu has published ~400 research papers (including 10 Science and Nature). He has received many awards, including: the Highly Cited Researchers list by Clarivate Analytics (2016-2021), a Blavatnik National Awards Honoree; the TAPPI Nano Middle Career Award (2019); 2018/2020/2021 R&D 100 Winner, the Nano Letters Young Investigator Lectureship (2017), the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award (2016), and the Air Force Young Investigator Award (AFOSR YIP , 2013). He is an MRS fellow.

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Fri 06 May 13:00: Fieldwork event

Thu, 05/05/2022 - 14:47
Fieldwork event

Come and hear about the exciting and not so exciting aspects of fieldwork! We have a great line up of talks which will include many photos and videos of how observational data is collected and the new research results that have come out from the data obtained.

1:00—1:30 pm Aaron Wienkers: Confronting fronts in the Gulf of Mexico

1:40—2:10 pm Hugh Venables: Sampling the Southern Ocean, from ship, small boat and tent

2:20—2:30 pm Short Tea and coffee break

2:30—3:00 pm Chiara Gioro: The AErosols, RadiatiOn and CLOuds in southern Africa (AEROCLO-sA) field campaign in Namibia and other adventures

3:10—3:40 pm Gabby Klebber: Monitoring Terrestrial Methane Seeps: Winter and Summer Fieldwork in the High Arctic

3:30—4:00pm Cake

Sign up here (for catering purposes): https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeiMfYRSbB6ssqVh69GDxbYXAAutGQg-qTkfAgunfky0QEnbg/viewform?usp=sf_link

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Wed 18 May 16:00: Earthquake ground-motion assessment and rupture behaviours of induced seismicity from deep geothermal production

Wed, 04/05/2022 - 15:16
Earthquake ground-motion assessment and rupture behaviours of induced seismicity from deep geothermal production

With UK’s net-zero carbon emissions goal for 2050, geothermal energy has become a promising renewable energy source with its low carbon footprint. In 2020, it stood for 4.5% of UK’s renewable energy, and there are several geothermal projects planned for the near future. However, one of the risks associated with geothermal production is induced seismicity. Although small microseismic events are natural at geothermal sites, a few recent cases of larger earthquakes overseas have alarmed the public, caused damage, and paused or halted the energy development. Thus, as UK is developing its geothermal sites, it is important to analyse the first earthquakes available from each location to better understand how the regions respond to ground motions and how the earthquakes behave.

Using a local Raspberry Shakes seismic network, we examined the induced earthquakes from the United Downs geothermal site in Cornwall, UK, and found that the region experiences more high-frequency content than expected based on relevant models. We also concluded that low-cost Raspberry Shakes are a suitable alternative for preliminary seismic hazard analysis in regions lacking seismic networks. Additionally, we investigated the first induced earthquakes from the Helsinki, Finland, deep geothermal site to get a closer look at the rupture behaviour of the earthquakes, identifying clear rupture directivity and complex behaviour similar to larger, natural earthquakes.

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