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CambPlants Hub

A networking organisation for plants-related research and impact
 
Read more at: Researchers discover how plants distinguish beneficial from harmful microbes

Researchers discover how plants distinguish beneficial from harmful microbes

10 August 2020

A team of plant research scientists from Aarhus University working on the global ENSA project to sustainably increase yields for small-holder farmers has made a major step towards their goal to engineer nitrogen fixation in cereal crops. Legume plants know their friends from their enemies, and now we know how they do it at...

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Read more at: Climate warming affects individual trees differently, driving evolutionary responses

Climate warming affects individual trees differently, driving evolutionary responses

9 July 2020

Research involving the University of Liverpool has revealed how natural selection can shape the long-term response of trees to climate change. Many tree species reproduce using a strategy called masting, where they switch between years of high and low seed production. Concentrating seed production into occasional bumper...

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Read more at: Eight Cambridge researchers elected as members of the European Molecular Biology Organisation

Eight Cambridge researchers elected as members of the European Molecular Biology Organisation

7 July 2020

Eight Cambridge researchers - six from the University of Cambridge and two from the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology - are among the 63 scientists from around the world elected this year as Members and Associate Members of the European Molecular Biology Organisation (EMBO). EMBO Membership honours distinguished...

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Gold mining restricts Amazon rainforest recovery

Gold mining restricts Amazon rainforest recovery

29 June 2020

Gold mining significantly limits the regrowth of Amazon forests, greatly reducing their ability to accumulate carbon, according to a new study. The researchers warn that the impacts of mining on tropical forests are long-lasting and that active land management and restoration will be necessary to recover tropical forests on previously mined lands.

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rice field

British farmers need all the help science can offer. Time to allow gene editing.

15 June 2020

Plant scientist Sir David Baulcombe argues we must adapt the way we produce food to meet future agricultural challenges

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michelle guyana

Long-term thermal sensitivity of Earth’s tropical forests

22 May 2020

Tropical forests are well-known as crucial global carbon sinks that act by removing carbon from the atmosphere and storing it in trees, thereby slowing climate change. There are fears that global heating can reduce this storage capacity if tree growth reduces or tree death increases, further accelerating climate change.

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matt davey antarctica

Climate change will turn coastal Antarctica green, say scientists

20 May 2020

Scientists have created the first ever large-scale map of microscopic algae as they bloomed across the surface of snow along the Antarctic Peninsula coast. Results indicate that this ‘green snow’ is likely to spread as global temperatures increase.

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Ottoline Leyser

Professor Ottoline Leyser DBE FRS elected as Regius Professor of Botany

14 May 2020

Professor Dame Ottoline Leyser DBE FRS has been elected as Regius Professor of Botany and she will take up the post in October 2020. Her role as Director of the Sainsbury Laboratory will be taken over by Prof Henrik Jönsson.

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arbuscules

Publication: The negative regulator SMAX1 controls mycorrhizal symbiosis and strigolactone biosynthesis in rice

30 April 2020

The Paszkowski Lab at the Department of Plant Sciences are pleased to announce the publication of their latest paper in Nature Communications: The negative regulator SMAX1 controls mycorrhizal symbiosis and strigolactone biosynthesis in rice.

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giles oldroyd

Giles Oldroyd elected as a fellow of the Royal Society

29 April 2020

Professor Giles Oldroyd has been recognised for his outstanding contributions to science in plant-microbe interactions with his election as a fellow of the Royal Society.

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Visualising photoprotection: how plants defend against high light

28 April 2020

The CambPlants Hub presents work from the Kromdijk Lab, located in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of Cambridge. This is a condensed version of the work that was to be presented at Cambridge Science Festival in March 2020. In this video researchers from the Kromdijk Lab explore how plants are affected by and respond to high light, which can damage the photosynthetic machinery. They visualise the down-regulation of light harvesting in real time using a fluorescence imager.

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algalcentre

Young Innovators' Forum visit to the Sainsbury Lab and the Algal Innovation Centre

23 April 2020

At the end of January, the CambPlants Hub visited the Sainsbury Lab and Algal Innovation Centre (both part of the University of Cambridge) as part of a Young Innovators’ Forum (YIF) group hosted by Agri-TechE. This visit was part of the YIF programme, which aims to bring together early career entrants from across farming, science and technology at innovative agri-business and research facilities.

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covid-19 tool

Interactive tool shows the science behind COVID-19 control measures

20 April 2020

An online tool to illustrate the effects of different COVID-19 control measures has been developed by a team of University of Cambridge researchers.

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Taking stomatal imprints: observing the tiny pores in leaves around you

15 April 2020

The CambPlants Hub presents work from the Kromdijk Lab, located in the Department of Plant Sciences at the University of Cambridge. This is a condensed version of the work that was to be presented at Cambridge Science Festival in March 2020, and is a step-by-step video detailing how you can take an imprint and observe stomata, the tiny pores in leaf surfaces that are responsible for regulating water and carbon dioxide exchange in the plant.

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Vomiting bumblebees show that sweeter is not necessarily better

Vomiting bumblebees show that sweeter is not necessarily better

23 January 2020

Animal pollinators support the production of three-quarters of the world’s food crops, and many flowers produce nectar to reward the pollinators. A new study using bumblebees has found that the sweetest nectar is not necessarily the best: too much sugar slows down the bees. The results will inform breeding efforts to make crops more attractive to pollinators, boosting yields to feed our growing global population.

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Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests

Local water availability is permanently reduced after planting forests

23 January 2020

River flow is reduced in areas where forests have been planted and does not recover over time, a new study has shown. Rivers in some regions can completely disappear within a decade. This highlights the need to consider the impact on regional water availability, as well as the wider climate benefit, of tree-planting plans.

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Degraded soils mean tropical forests may never fully recover from logging

Degraded soils mean tropical forests may never fully recover from logging

18 December 2019

Continually logging and re-growing tropical forests to supply timber is reducing the levels of vital nutrients in the soil, which may limit future forest growth and recovery, a new study suggests. This raises concerns about the long-term sustainability of logging in the tropics.

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How climate change could double greenhouse gas emissions from freshwater ecosystems

How climate change could double greenhouse gas emissions from freshwater ecosystems

21 November 2019

There has been enormous interest in Dr Andrew Tanentzap’s study on how climate change could double greenhouse gas emissions from freshwater ecosystems.

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map genomes

Ambitious project launched to map genomes of all life in British Isles

8 November 2019

An unprecedented insight into the diverse range of species on the British Isles will be made possible by Wellcome funding to the Darwin Tree of Life project.

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How can researchers get involved with science policy?

How can researchers get involved with science policy?

8 October 2019

The CambPlants Policy Lunch took place on the 19th September 2019. Here Rebekah Hinton (Part II undergraduate student in Plant Sciences) summarises what was said...

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